Archive for January, 2020

Skeptics with a K: Episode #267

Golden tickets, talking to the press, butt-chugging, and skeptical investigations. Plus Star Wars, cardboard crowns, and crashing into a lake. It’s a new year, and a new you, from Skeptics with a K.

Mixed and edited by Morgan Clarke.

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Natalie Bennett – Universal Basic Income

When:  Thursday, January 16th 2020, 7.30pm – 11.00pm

Where: The Casa Bar, 29 Hope Street

Bennett

Natalie Bennett was the leader of the Green Party from 2012-2016. Over that time she and the party became known as champions of the policy of universal basic income – a guarantee that people’s basic needs will be met by an unconditional payment to meet their essential needs.

She argues that it is a guarantee of the basic human right to life, a way of providing people with the chance to use their talents well, and ends benefit traps. No one would be left penniless, as far too many are being left now by zero-hours contracts and swingeing benefit sanctions. And it might mean that sewer cleaners are paid more than bankers – as they probably should be.

Trials are underway now in Finland, Holland, Canada, the US and Kenya – it is an idea that is catching on fast, in part because of fears about the impact of automation on jobs.

 

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Daniel Artus – Vaccine Hesitancy, Confidence and Empathy

When:  Thursday, February 20th 2020, 7.30pm – 11.00pm

Where: The Casa Bar, 29 Hope Street

Daniel Artus

Vaccines are a cornerstone of global public heath, having prevented sickness and death at enormous scale – even eliminating or near-eliminating deadly diseases. What, then, leads to reject or doubt the safety of simple procedure that so many of us easily accept?

This short talk explore specific crises of vaccine confidence through a series of case studies. From the Nigerian polio vaccine boycott in 2003 to recent concerns over the HPV vaccine, each scenario sets out specific drivers behind vaccine hesitancy, refusal and acceptance.

Drawing on ethnography and public health literature, the talk will set out some the myriad reasons that many communities may mistrust of what appears a to be common sense to so many of us, whist highlighting how this foundation of empathy is critical in individual and policy responses to the issue. Read the rest of this entry »

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